How to Write an Effective Problem Statement Rod Morgan1

Continuous improvement specialists are challenged to solve problems for their organizations or clients. They have acquired a wide array of tools, methods and techniques for that purpose. If continuous improvement practitioners are able to establish the winning conditions for change, they can look forward to successful outcomes. However, the devil is in the details, making continuous improvement jobs interesting and challenging.

One of those “little devils” that often gets overlooked is the need to construct an effective problem statement at the start of any improvement project.

What Is a Problem Statement?

Adapted from an article by Alan Bryman in the International Journal of Social Research Methodology: A problem is a statement about an area of concern, a condition to be improved upon, a difficulty to be eliminated, or a troubling question that exists in theory or in practice that points to the need for meaningful understanding and deliberate investigation.

Why Is It So Hard to Write an Effective Problem Statement?

One of the challenges in writing a great problem statement is the distractions that can come from a variety of sources.

  • Symptoms associated with the problem add to the confusion when trying to describe a problem. For example, arriving at the physician’s office and stating, “Doctor, I am experiencing pain in the back of my thigh down to the lower part of my leg! I need you to ‘fix’ my leg!” It is only after a thoughtful evaluation that the doctor concludes that your problem lies with your sciatic nerve and originates in your lower back.
  • Solutions are often an early consideration when wrestling with a problem. When one is faced with a problem, alleviating that pain as quickly as possible is a natural, almost reflexive, action. It is, however, extremely important to avoid jumping to solutions until a profound understanding of the current state is achieved.
  • The search for causes of your pain is a natural reaction that also needs to be avoided when first describing a problem. Establishing root cause will be a part of the ensuing investigative procedure but should be reserved for the appropriate time in the lifecycle of the problem-solving method.
  • Blame is also a natural reflex when one is afflicted with a problem. A quote attributed to John Burroughs, American naturalist and nature essayist, may be all that needs to be said on this subject: “You can get discouraged many times, but you are not a failure until you begin to blame somebody else and stop trying.”

In short, a great problem statement must be free of causes, solutions and blame, and careful consideration must be given to ensure symptoms do not become a distraction.

What Is in a Problem Statement?

A problem statement should describe an undesirable gap between the current-state level of performance and the desired future-state level of performance. A problem statement should include absolute or relative measures of the problem that quantify that gap, but should not include possible causes or solutions!

Key elements of an effective problem statement include:

  • Gap: Identify the gap (pain) that exists today.
  • Timeframe, location and trend: Describe when and where the problem was first observed and what kind of trend it is following.
  • Impact: Quantify the gap (cost, time, quality, environmental, personal, etc.)
  • Importance: To the organization, the individual, etc. to better understand the urgency.

What Method Can I Employ to Author a Great Problem Statement?

The ability to articulate an effective problem statement is not simply a business skill – it is a life skill. How can children, youth and adults begin to solve problems if they haven’t been able to adequately describe them? This holds true for continuous improvement specialists.

The 5W2H (what, when, where, why, who, how, how much) method is deceptively simple. Ask the right questions in the right order and let the answers lead you to a great problem statement.

Example of Developing a Problem Statement

Let’s walk through the 5W2H method for manufacturing and call center examples.

Question 1What is the problem that needs to be solved?

  • Manufacturer: Window frames and parts are ending up in the assembly department missing required weep holes or slots.
  • Call center: The assessment call is too complex, time consuming and administratively heavy, resulting in a diminished experience for the client as well as the staff member performing the work.

Question 2Why is it a problem? (highlight the pain)

  • Manufacturer: If identified (visual inspection), the affected parts must be sent back for rework, thereby increasing the overall cost of manufacturing, creating higher inventory levels (WIP) and increasing risk since some of the defects may not be detected until later in the process, or worse, they may end up being incorrectly shipped to the job sites.
  • Call center: This results in higher variability and length of call handling time, clients having to repeat their “story” as the move through the assessment and downstream case worker (meeting) process, clients providing more information than may be required, increased workload for the assessment worker and increased wait times in the (telephone) queue. The overall impact is reduced service levels as well as diminished client and assessment worker experience.

Question 3Where is the problem observed? (location, products)

  • Manufacturer: This problem is observed in the assembly department, downstream departments as well as ultimately in the field with customer complaints and costly field repairs and replacements.
  • Call center: This problem is observed in all assessment calls but will vary in magnitude depending on the client (needs and circumstance), assessment worker (experience) and other factors that contribute to variation in the handling of assessment calls.

Question 4Who is impacted? (customers, businesses, departments)

  • Manufacturer: This problem affects the assembly department that is tasked with trying to inspect for the error and react accordingly, rework occurring in the department/work cell responsible for weep holes and slots, the company as a whole in terms of cost, brand and reputation, and, most importantly, the customer who is affected by this problem if it makes it to the field.
  • Call center: This affects the client associated with the call, clients waiting in the queue, client’s families, and the organization and employers in the community being served.

Question 5When was the problem first observed?

  • Manufacturer: This has been an ongoing issue going back as far as memory serves in the long-term employees, but with increased volume and more customization and higher complexity in design, the impact and severity of this problem has increased rapidly over the last two years.
  • Call center: This is a latent problem that has always existed but has become more evident with recent changes, including changes in funding, legislation, demand for services, client demographics and recent integration efforts in the organization as part of their ongoing commitment to continuous improvement of service pathways and client experience.

Question 6How is the problem observed? (symptoms)

  • Manufacturer: Customer (in-field installation and service) complaints, increased warranty costs, manufacturing non-conformance reports (NCR), complaints from assembly department team and increased costs in fabrication.
  • Call center: This problem is observed in the variation in call-handling times, wait times in the telephone queue, call abandon rates, increased stress in front-line staff (workload and client anxiety/dissatisfaction) and ambiguity in call handling protocols.

Question 7How often is the problem observed? (error rate, magnitude, trend)

  • Manufacturer: There is an observed 62,000 parts per million (PPM) for this specific defect, taking into consideration rework completed in-house and observed defects in the field. The PPM is derived from the number of weeping holes and slots required per unit assembly versus the actual number of deficiencies overall observed for the same number of units.
  • Call center: This is a daily operational occurrence but increases in call complexity related to changes in the knowledge base – multiple programs and changes in the environment (client demographics and needs/circumstances, legislation, etc.) – have resulted in an increase in severity and stress on the system.

Your Turn!

Think of a problem you have encountered in your personal or professional life, or a problem you are currently tasked to solve. Employ the preceding method of asking seven simple questions and see where it takes you.

Teach this simple and effective method to your friends, colleagues and family. Writing problem statements truly is a life skill and, when employed correctly, will place anyone in good stead to start solving the problem.

GM LEAN SIX SIGMA BLACK BELT- SCM- BUSINESS EXCELLENCE/ TRANSFORMATION

JOB DESCRIPTION

Location : Bangalore
Level : General Manger
Role : Business Excellence Advisory Manager

Mandatory requirements : 

– Functional experience Drive improvement initiatives through teams
– Experience on driving automation projects. (preferably not limiting to opportunity identification)
– Domain knowledge is an added advantage – Supply Chain / Procurement
– Team leading experience
– Leadership presence

Preferred Skills : 
– Six Sigma Black Belt / Master Black Belt with good knowledge of Lean practices
– Strong Knowledge of Quality Principles and Techniques essential
– Needs to have worked in a BPO Operational Excellence (or similar) function
– Certification in Lean and other quality practices added advantage
– Strong communication and presentation skills

Position Objectives : 

1. Drive Improvement projects on processes to improve Productivity and Improve SLA performance
2. Interact with client/ internal stakeholders to drive and influence improvement objectives
3. Lead a global projects in OE
4. People manager for a team
5. Drives the OE program for a client/ clients in a site/ across sites
6. Acts as a mentor to Six Sigma and Lean projects for his influence

Relevant exp : 

10 to 14 years of relevant experience and 14-18 yrs of overall experience

Salary: Not Disclosed by Recruiter
Industry: BPO / Call Centre / ITES
Functional Area: ITES, BPO, KPO, LPO, Customer Service, Operations
Role Category: Senior Management
Role: Head/VP/GM-Quality Assurance & Quality Control
Employment Type: Permanent Job, Full Time
Keyskills:

six sigma, lean, master black belt, business excellence, operational excellence, supply chain, Process Excellence, MBB, Six Sigma Black Belt.

ELECTRONICS COMPANY USES LEAN SIX SIGMA; WINS AWARDS FOR OPERATIONAL EXCELLENCE

A global electronics company won two awards this year for projects that used the principles of Lean Six Sigma to improve efficiency in the company’s warehouse and shipping departments.

One of the main components of the initiative incorporates a key part of Lean – it was driven by employees from the “bottom up.”

 

The company, Arrow Electronics, won two awards during the annual Business Transformation and Operational Excellence Awards (BTOES) ceremony in Orlando, Fla. Arrow, headquartered in Colorado, is a global supplier for industrial and commercial users of electronic components and enterprise computing solutions.

Arrow won the Best Achievement of Operational Excellence in Technology and Communications award for a project that used video to increase productivity by 56% and reduce the walking steps for employees by 6.8 million (about 3,400 miles).

“Arrow’s global logistics services team is constantly looking for new and innovative ways to better serve our customers, both internally and externally,” Mary Beth Edwards, Arrow’s vice president of global business operations, said in a news release.

That statement shows the commitment to process improvement and Lean, Six Sigma and Lean Six Sigma that has helped improve operations at many companies.

How They Did It

For the warehouse project, an employee-driven idea was conceived to use high-definition video shot from above the warehouse floor to record operations within the facility. While they had performed this since 2016, in 2017 the company added 360-degree cameras to capture all of the operation.

The cameras also fed the video directly to the Cloud, allowing company officials to review the videos on any device and from any location.

Employees met with an Arrow worker who is a Lean Six Sigma Black Belt to analyze the video. Lean focuses on cutting out waste from an operation. One of the major areas of focus is on wasted employee movement. Using the video, Arrow employees and the Lean Six Sigma Black Belt found areas where changes could be made to make the warehouse operation more efficient.

Implementing those changes is what led to the elimination of almost seven million wasted steps and the significant increase in warehouse productivity. Perhaps most importantly, the initiative was not “top down” but “bottom up,” with employees developing the idea and having buy-in on the ultimate goal.

Click To Ship

The second award for digital transformation also related to Lean Six Sigma methodology. The company streamlined how data moved on the site, making processing times faster for customers through the “click to ship” process improvement project.

The changes resulted in Arrow achieving much higher same-day shipping results just 90 days after the project was launched.

The BTOES awards focus on recognizing operational excellence. Winners are chosen based on how they have executed a business strategy that makes their operation more consistent and reliable than competitors. A panel of operational excellence experts judge the entries. Getting shortlisted for an award – and winning one – gives companies the industry recognition that can lead to both recruitment of better employees and to more business opportunities, according to BTOES.

Also, BTOES looks for businesses that have lowered operational risk and cost while also increasing revenue when compared to competitors. The organization believes technological  innovation has created a situation where businesses need to undergo an “end-to-end business transformation.”

They list both Lean and Six Sigma approaches as being central to that transformation.

Other Awards

Lean, Six Sigma and Lean Six Sigma are increasingly getting recognition and awards for the significant positive impact they can have on a business operation.

Recent examples include:

  • Healthcare supply chain companies who have used process improvement methodologies to improve performance.
  • Small businesses, a government agency and healthcare companies that used process improvement projects to win a 2017 Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award, which recognizes exceptional work in process improvement and customer service.
  • Universities, including Singapore Management University, that have won awards for implementing Lean and Six Sigma-driven process improvement projects

Lean, Six Sigma and Lean Six Sigma continue to make inroads into all areas of the business, academic, nonprofit and governmental sectors. For those who have decided to earn certification in the methodology, the time has never been better to put your talents to use.

Six sigma JOB- Senior Process Engineer

Responsibilities:
  • Plans, conducts and directs analysis, development and implementation for engineering assignments regarding equipment and/or process enhancements that will improve efficiency, quality and safety. Manages multiple projects across various disciplines.
  • Develops test plans and qualifies new equipment/software and performs vendor and site acceptance testing to meet internal and external standards.
  • Identifies key opportunities to develop and implement equipment and/or process enhancements that will improve efficiency, product yield and safety including justification of capital projects for future project development.
  • Utilizes statistical tools to determine process response to controllable factors.
  • Prepares equipment, process, safety and materials specifications and conducts technical analysis of vendor proposals.
  • Collaborates with teams of outside designers, consultants and contractors.
  • Performs other related duties as assigned by management.

Qualifications

  • Minimum of a Bachelor’s Degree is required
  • Focused degree in Engineering, such as Industrial or Mechanical Engineering is preferred
  • Minimum 4 years engineering experience engineering environment is required
  • Engineering experience in Distribution or Manufacturing is preferred
  • 1 year of experience working in FDA or highly regulated environment is preferred
  • Project management experience is an asset
  • Ability to analyze large volumes of data and model processes is required
  • Advanced Excel skills required, SQL skills preferred
  • Statistical analysis experience is preferred
  • CSV / SDLC software validation knowledge is preferred
  • Root cause problem solving is an asset
  • Experience with Lean / Six Sigma and/or JJOS methodology is preferred
  • Experience performing Time Studies in TimerPro or other relevant software is an asset
  • Position located in Jacksonville, FL, with consideration for Fontana, CA, Mooresville, IN, or Tobyhanna, PA is required.
  • Up to 50% international and domestic travel is required

Do you strive to join an outstanding team that is dynamic and ever-changing? Is career growth and opportunity appealing to you? Apply to this opportunity today.

Johnson & Johnson Family of Companies are equal opportunity employers, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, genetic information, national origin, protected veteran status, disability status, or any other characteristic protected by law.

Six sigma Black belt Job- Head/VP/GM-Quality Assurance & Quality Control

JOB DESCRIPTION

Location : Bangalore
Level : GM
Role : Business Excellence Leader
Domain : Healthcare / BSFI / F&A

Mandatory requirements :

  • Functional experience Drive improvement initiatives through teams
  • Experience on driving automation projects. (preferably not limiting to opportunity identification)
  • Domain knowledge is an added advantage Healthcare – Payer / Provider operations
  • Team leading experience
  • Leadership presence

Preferred Skills

  • Six Sigma Master Black Belt with good knowledge of Lean practices
  • Strong Knowledge of Quality Principles and Techniques essential
  • Needs to have worked in a BPO Operational Excellence (or similar) function
  • Certification in Lean and other quality practices added advantage
  • Strong communication and presentation skills

Position Objectives 
1. Drive Improvement projects on processes to improve
Productivity
Improve SLA performance
2. Interact with client/ internal stakeholders to drive and influence improvement objectives
3. Lead a global projects in OE
4. People manager for a team
5. Drives the OE program for a client/ clients in a site/ across sites
6. Acts as a mentor to Six Sigma and Lean projects for his influence

Relevant exp 

  • 10 to 14 years of relevant experience and 14-18 yrs of overall experience

Salary: Not Disclosed by Recruiter
Industry: BPO / Call Centre / ITES
Functional Area: ITES, BPO, KPO, LPO, Customer Service, Operations
Role Category: Senior Management
Role: Head/VP/GM-Quality Assurance & Quality Control
Employment Type: Permanent Job, Full Time
Keyskills: six sigma, lean, master black belt, business excellence, operational excellence, opportunity identification, RPA Robotic Process, Automation, Black Belt, MBB, Quality, Health care, Health Care Business, Transformation.

A Reason to Do Lean and Six Sigma Executives Will Embrace

What is the actual, demonstrated output of your organization’s system (production parts or service hours)? Does it change from week to week, day to day, even hour to hour? If so, then you are dealing with “capacity leaks” that will result in significant profit losses.

Early in my career, some 30 years ago, I had a conversation with my boss that went something like this:

Boss: “Yeah, Dyer, what do you want now?”

Me: “I was reading in the latest issue of IndustryWeek magazine (the company provided subscriptions to all of the engineers) that in Japan, they are now using teams of shop-floor employees to help them solve their quality problems. I think we should give this a try.”

Boss: “What!?! Take shop employees out of production so they can work on problems? That is the dumbest thing I ever heard. We pay our employees to use their hands to make stuff, not think! (Yes, this was actually said back then) Isn’t solving problems why we pay you engineers? What would be the benefit of taking people off the shop floor?”

Me (somewhat naïvely): “Think how much morale will be boosted if the employees have a say in how their processes are improved.”

Boss: “Improving morale and a quarter will buy me a cup of coffee. Now, get out of my office and back to work!”

A few weeks later, I gave it another try.

Me: “Boss, I have been thinking about your question of what the benefit would be to the company for using teams of workers to solve problems. The people who do the work are closest to the problems and will have ideas on how to fix things. By reducing our defects, our customers would be happier with our products and service. That would lead to more sales!”

At this point, my boss tossed me a thick report. On the cover was a chart with bars getting taller each month.

Boss: “See that report? That shows our backlog. It keeps growing, so our customers already love our product. We don’t need to make them any happier. Now, get out of my office…”

Me: “I know… get back to work.”

After several more weeks of pestering my boss, he finally gave in and allowed a team to be formed of engineers and shop-floor employees. We met several times and started solving some major quality issues that had been plaguing us for years. This team was having a real impact and then we hit a brick wall. The people who repaired our defective product (the highest paid position in production) became fearful that if we fixed too many quality problems, they would be out of a job. So, they put pressure on the workers to stop attending the improvement meetings. The team was disbanded shortly thereafter.

Boss: “Told you this was a bad idea. But the brass upstairs heard about the progress your team made in reducing quality defects and wants to know if you would be interested in digging deeper into this whole “team-based problem-solving” approach?”

Ten years later, after having the opportunity to benchmark several companies that were excelling in making improvement happen, attend classes taught by Dr. W. Edwards Deming, Brian Joiner, and Steven Covey, and completing the original Six Sigma training at Motorola University, my answer to “What is the benefit?” had changed considerably.

The example that follows is based on what happened next.

“Ok. Everyone settle down and find a seat. We need to get this staff meeting started,” said Jim Brown the new leader of the XYZ business unit. “I want to introduce a friend of mine, Jane Robinson, from corporate who I have invited in to help us with our output problem. As you all know, our backlog has been growing steadily for over a year, and it does not appear to be getting any better. We need some help in figuring out how to deal with this situation.”

After all of the introductions were complete, Jane asked the following: “So, what is the capacity of your system to produce product on a daily basis?”

“Well. We have made over 2,300 units in a day,” said the director of operations.

“Ok. The demand for your product seems to be around 1,800 a day,” said Jane. “So, why is the backlog growing?”

“We don’t hit 2,300 very often,” said Jim. “Our daily output seems to be all over the place. I am not even sure we know what our daily average is, especially when we factor in the fact that the first few days of every month, the output drops significantly.”

“That is because we drain the supply chain in order to try and hit the end of the month production targets,” said one of the production line leaders.

“Do you have the output numbers for the past several months?” asked Jane. “I would like to put the data on a control chart to better understand how much variation there is in the numbers.”

“Isn’t a control chart used to track variation in product quality?” asked Jim.

“Actually, it can be used to analyze any form of random data,” said Jane. “And it sounds like your data is pretty random.

After the information was gathered, Jane created a control chart and presented the results at the next staff meeting.

After passing out the chart, Jane went to the white board and wrote the following:

“So, based on this chart, the most output we can guarantee (within reason) to our customers in a day is only 300 units, and since the average (mean) is only 1,300 units, it is easy to see why the backlog continues to grow. So, we have two issues according to this data. One, the output has way too much variation. It is impossible to know from day to day how much product is going to be sent to our customers. This variability must be wreaking havoc on our supply chain. And, two, we clearly have a lot of capacity leaks causing the average to be significantly below what our customers need.”

“Capacity leaks? What do you mean by capacity leaks?” asked the director of operations.

“There are many examples I have already seen of capacity leaks in this facility,” said Jane. “The easy ones to identify are related to the constraint or bottleneck of our system. If the bottleneck is ever starved of parts or has a quality issue or is not running for whatever reason, we lose system capacity that can never be recovered. After the bottleneck, if a part is scrapped or we make something that is not needed, that will also cause capacity leaks.”

“So, how do we stop all of these leaks?” asked Jim.

“We need to immediately begin training our employees in the tools and methodologies of lean and Six Sigma and begin forming improvement teams; one per process that impacts the output of our system,” said Jane.

“Wait a minute!” exclaimed the director of operations. “We already can’t keep up with demand and you want to take people away from their work stations? That is going to cause us to get even further behind.”

“Look,” said Jim. “We have to do something and do it soon if we want to keep our customers. They are sticking with us for now, but complaints are starting to increase. So, I will take full responsibility for any negative impact to output as we do the training and team meetings. Also, I want to review these output charts with all of our employees and post weekly updates so every employee can keep up with our progress.”

Several months passed, the training was completed, and employee teams were formed. All of the employees were taught the importance of identifying and eliminating “capacity leaks” using the lean and Six Sigma tools. Large scoreboards were installed so employees could see, in real time, how they were doing with key safety, quality and output metrics. The first time they finished the day with zero safety issues, 100% good quality, and made 100% of the daily schedule, the entire plant erupted in applause and cheers.

“Ok, everyone find a seat and let’s get started,” said Jim to his staff. A year had passed since their first meeting with Jane. “Do you have the latest graph showing our output?”

The director of operations presented the following chart:

“Looks like there has been significant improvement in the variability of the output of our system,” said Jane. We can now guarantee over 2,250 units a day to our customers.

“Wait, what happened? Why did our output drop a few days ago?” asked Jim.

“We are all caught up,” beamed the director of operations. “No more backlog. So, now we are only making what our customers order.”

“Hmmm…” thought Jim. “It seems I need to go to the sales group and see what we can do to get demand up.”

“Shouldn’t we start the process of laying off a quarter of the workforce?” asked the director of finance. “We owe it to our parent company to cut our costs and clearly, we no longer need so many workers.”

“Wait a minute!” exclaimed Jane. “The workforce you want to get rid of is what saved our bacon. If we lay off a single person, then don’t expect to get another idea for improvement!”

“No, we won’t start laying anyone off,” said Jim. “Our current profit margin is about 10%. Think about this… we know we have the people and equipment to make up to 2,250 consistently. So, for every unit we sell above our current average demand rate of 1,800, the only additional cost is the raw material and a little bit for power and supplies. The equipment, overhead and labor costs are already absorbed. So, the profit margin on these additional units will be over 40%! We could run a special price cut for our best customers and still produce margins three times the current rate. What a fantastic opportunity! This would not have been possible without a stable, predictable system.”

The Grand Slam Home Run of Improvement

So, back to the question at the beginning of the article… What is the actual, demonstrated output of your organization’s system (production parts or service hours)? If your system of producing product or services is unpredictable, then finding the bottleneck becomes difficult. And, if the system’s constraint cannot be easily identified, then it is nearly impossible to know how your capacity matches up with current customer demand (See article “Understanding the Demand/Capacity Curve” for more information). So, the idea of getting rid of waste needs to be expanded to “How do we get rid of ‘capacity leaks’ to create stable, predictable systems?”

Once this is done, then the order fulfillment team can sit down with the sales and marketing organization and discuss growth strategies that can actually be planned. The profit margins on this additional output (assuming the product or service can be sold) will be amazingly high. Or, another way to think about the results is that the sunk costs will now be spread over a larger quantity of parts, resulting in lower total costs per unit sold. This will generate excitement and support with the business leaders.

What about the systems that have mixed models, seasonal demand and other unpredictable inputs? Some of these are valid concerns and will make it more difficult (but not impossible) to create a predictable system. However, some of this “chaos and complexity” is self-inflicted. When your company leaders do their strategic plans each year, how much time do they spend discussing ways to de-complex their order fulfillment system? For example, one company that swore it was a seasonal producer, supplied product to schools and universities that only did retrofits during the summer months (or so the manufacturer believed). The leaders decided to launch a lean and Six Sigma initiative as part of their business strategy. When they were able to reduce the delivery times from 10 weeks to two days, their customers started buying product throughout the year because they could begin planning retrofits on the weekends. This smoothed their demand considerably.

Keep in mind that these principles also apply to service providers. Recently, I had the opportunity to spend several days in a major downtown hospital. The doctors and nurses were amazing and the care could not have been better. However, when it came time to be discharged, it took over five hours. The hospital was full with several patients waiting for open rooms. This five-hour “capacity leak” gets multiplied many times each day, resulting in the equivalence of several rooms of capacity being wasted.

Equipment Utilization

Finally, for those of you who have kept up with my articles for IndustryWeek, you know that one of my pet peeves is using employee and equipment utilization as key metrics. In fact, I have proclaimed that if utilization is one of your company’s metrics to indicate order fulfillment performance, then lean will never be a reality. However, in a system that produces a stable, predictable output, employee and equipment utilization is actually an indicator as to how demand is holding up. So, as more companies have successful lean and Six Sigma initiatives, the idea of measuring utilization needs to be updated and shifted from operations to tracking the impact of sales and marketing.

A better metric for operations to track is “linearity.” Linearity is an indicator of what percentage of the schedule did you actually build that day (both volume and model mix). If your company achieves “make to order” status, then linearity is a critical piece of data to track. And, if linearity stays near 100%, then several other key metrics, such as on-time delivery, will also be robust.

The idea of identifying capacity leaks fits with lean tools such as value stream mapping. As teams map their processes and identify non-value-added steps, they can also identify where “chaos and complexity” is occurring resulting in capacity leaks. Once these leaks are reduced or eliminated, a stable system begins to emerge, making it much easier to plan ways to meet your customers’ needs (and create amazing profit margins). That is a reason for making lean and Six Sigma a part of your company’s strategic plan your leaders will enthusiastically support.

URGENT OPPORTUNITY – VP/DIRECTOR OPEX – CHENNAI

JOB DESCRIPTION

Job Descriptions :-

OPEX Level 6:

Must have skills
Experience on driving process improvement initiatives through a team of BB/MBB
Understanding of features & functionalities of RPA tools, approach to identify opportunities, qualify them and deploy etc
Drive change management through stakeholder management and influence business improvement objectives for the vertical
Domain knowledge is an added advantage (preferably BFSI)

Basis requirements
Post graduate with minimum 13 to 16 years of experience in Operations Excellence.
Six Sigma Master Black Belt with good knowledge of Lean practices, Knowledge of Quality Principles and Techniques essential
Should have strong financial and client facing skills (strong delivery leader)
Should have experience into Robotics process automation business execution experience at clients.In depth understanding of features & functionalities of RPA tools.
Multi Domain and Process Expertise across Global Markets.
Should have mentored and led BB and GB projects- Acts as a mentor to Six Sigma and Lean projects
Ability to merge Technology & Process

Objectives:
Drive Improvement projects on processes to improve
a. Productivity
b. Improve SLA performance
Drive Automation penetration and improve business outcomes for client through evolution in Automation maturity curve
Interact with client/ internal stakeholders to drive and influence improvement objective
Lead a global projects in OE
People manager for a team
Drives the OE program for a client/ clients in a site/ across sites
Acts as a mentor to Six Sigma and Lean projects for his influence

Salary: INR 30,00,000 – 45,00,000 P.A.
Industry: BPO / Call Centre / ITES
Functional Area: ITES, BPO, KPO, LPO, Customer Service, Operations
Role Category: Senior Management
Role: Head/VP/GM-Quality Assurance & Quality Control
Employment Type: Permanent Job, Full Time
Keyskills: Six Sigma, Lean, Master Black Belt, MBB, Change Management, Operational Excellence, Process Improvement Initiatives, Operations, People Management , Stakeholder Management.

VP OPERATIONS TRANSFORMATION / CONSULTING

JOB DESCRIPTION

Entity : Accenture Operations
Role : Operations Transformation / Consulting
Location : Bangalore / Delhi / Mumbai
Domain Expertise : Finance & Accounting, Talent & Learning, Supply Chain & Procurement

JOB DESCRIPTION:

Provide consulting support to solve for strategic and operational business problems for our global clients leveraging Transformation methodologies and assets. The successful candidate should have strong consulting and business skills in addition to quantitative and analytical capabilities. Demonstrated experienced working with complex business process outsourcing, originating or delivering managed service opportunities. The right candidate will be creative and resourceful and will utilize traditional and out of the box solutions to achieve superior business outcomes.

Will be responsible for:

  • Develop methodologies to support Transformation projects
  • Partner effectively with Sales & Client relationship teams to source and selling new opportunities
  • Partner with client leads to understand business priority and operational challenges
  • Develop real world solutions to resolve client business needs.
  • Develop and articulate proof of concept for clients including strategy, scope, staffing, engagement setup and execution.
  • Lead and supervise Operations Transformation projects based solutions
  • Manage a team of consultants to ensure that deliverables are met with quality and in a timely fashion
  • Engage with Senior level stakeholders effectively in a dialogue
  • Develop new methodologies and assets to support Transformation projects
  • Work with deal teams to provide subject matter expertise and industry / offering insights for important client proposals and RFPs.
Experience:

  • 8 – 15 years of overall experience, with hands on experience in driving transformative consulting projects for at least 7-10 years & exposure to Outsourcing in a Consulting, Sales or Senior Delivery capability
  • Exposure to US/overseas Markets
  • Strong Consulting and project management skills and demonstrated experience in managing teams across functions and geographies
  • Prior experience of selling, shaping client opportunities in respective industry will be added advantage
Academic Qualifications:

  • MBA or equivalent business / economics / accounting degree from a recognized institution.

Key Competencies and Characteristics:

  • Proficiency in one or more of Transformation methodologies BPR, Lean etc.
  • Advanced Excel including VBA and PowerPoint skills
  • Ability to translate open ended business problems into a structured hypothesis
  • Comfortable with techniques like BPR . Six Sigma etc.
  • Excellent communication and interpersonal skills
  • Ability to tie analytic solutions to business/industry value and outcomes
  • Desire and ability to collaborate with business partners and drive initiatives
  • Willing to Travel for extended period of time
  • Flexible to work with global teams
  • Flexible to relocate as per business needs
Accenture is an equal opportunities employer and welcomes applications from all sections of society and does not discriminate on grounds of race, religion or belief, ethnic or national origin, disability, age, citizenship, marital, domestic or civil partnership status, sexual orientation, gender identity, or any other basis as protected by applicable law

Salary: Not Disclosed by Recruiter
Industry: Accounting / Finance
Functional Area: ITES, BPO, KPO, LPO, Customer Service, Operations
Role Category: Senior Management
Role: Head/VP/GM-Quality Assurance & Quality Control
Keyskills:

Lean, Transformation Six Sigma, VP, Business Process, Outsourcing ,Project Management, Business Transformation, BPR ,Lean Transformation, Re – engineering, Process Transfromation, Operations Consulting, Ops Consulting.

OPERATION EXCELLENCE/BUSINESS EXCELLENCE/PROCESS EXCELLENCE(ROBOTIC)

JOB DESCRIPTION

Must have skills
Experience on driving process improvement initiatives through a team of BB/MBB
Understanding of features & functionalities of RPA tools, approach to identify opportunities, qualify them and deploy etc
Drive change management through stakeholder management and influence business improvement objectives for the vertical
Domain knowledge is an added advantage (preferably BFSI)

Basis requirements
Post graduate with minimum 10 to 14 years of experience in Operations Excellence.
Six Sigma Master Black Belt with good knowledge of Lean practices, Knowledge of Quality Principles and Techniques essential
Should have strong financial and client facing skills (strong delivery leader)
Should have experience into Robotics process automation business execution experience at clients.In depth understanding of features & functionalities of RPA tools.
Multi Domain and Process Expertise across Global Markets.
Should have mentored and led BB and GB projects- Acts as a mentor to Six Sigma and Lean projects
Ability to merge Technology & Process

Objectives:
Drive Improvement projects on processes to improve
a. Productivity
b. Improve SLA performance
Drive Automation penetration and improve business outcomes for client through evolution in Automation maturity curve
Interact with client/ internal stakeholders to drive and influence improvement objective
Lead a global projects in OE
People manager for a team
Drives the OE program for a client/ clients in a site/ across sites
Acts as a mentor to Six Sigma and Lean projects for his influence

Salary: INR 17,00,000 – 32,00,000 P.A.
Industry: BPO / Call Centre / ITES
Functional Area: ITES, BPO, KPO, LPO, Customer Service, Operations
Role Category: Operations
Role: Operations Manager
Keyskills: Six Sigma, Master Black Belt, Process Excellence, MBB, Lean, Business Excellence, Change Management, Process Improvement, Initiatives, Operations, Operational Excellence, Robotics, RPA.

AM (voice Quality) (pcmm & CMMI Level 5 co.) (noida)

Job Description

1. Develop queries using Boolean and temporal logic to deliver the foundation for analysis to objectives agreed with the customer.
2. Perform analysis of query/call listening results in line with customer objectives to develop business cases.
3. Compile analysis results and create presentations.

Salary: INR Free cab Facility, Subsidized Meal and Mediclaim
Industry: BPO / Call Centre / ITES
Functional Area: ITES, BPO, KPO, LPO, Customer Service, Operations
Role Category: Back Office/Web/Transaction Processing
Role: Assistant Manager/Manager-(NonTechnical)
Keyskills: Voice, Quality, Six Sigma, lean, green belt, kaizen, assistant manager, team manager.