Prince 2 / Agile JOB- Product Manager

Agile

Job Description

Dear Candidate,

Greetings from Espire !!!

We have an urgent requirement of Java Project Manager .

JD is given below.

Position: Java Project Manager
Experience : 12+ Years.
Location : Gurgaon.
Relevant Experience: Java, Project Delivery, Quality process, Presales activities, PMP Certified.
Academic Qualifications: BE/ B.Tech/ MCA.
Joining Time: Candidate should comfortable for join us within a week.

Job Description:

  • Take-up roles like Project Scheduling, estimations, Risk Planning, Resource allocation, Client interaction and tracking, Status reporting, implementation and delivery.
  • Follow software development methodologies like Waterfall, Prototyping, Agile and SCRUM.
  • Determine costs, timeline, funding, resource requirements and business objectives.
  • Have knowledge on different estimations techniques like FPA, Work Break Down, etc.
  • Strong experience in Java technologies and should be aware about latest technologies around Java and J2ee
  • Should possess leadership quality and should be able to motivate the team.
  • Extensive knowledge and experience in managing multiple large projects/programs involving onsite-offshore delivery model.
  • Pro-active communication and Risk mitigation is mandatory.
  • Define clear roles and responsibilities to the team unambiguously.
  • Manage escalations and issues proactively.
  • Identify gaps and come out with process and action plans and tracking them to closure.
  • Having knowledge of Pre-Sales activities like RFPs, writing proposals, building POCs, brochures, etc. is added advantage.
  • Candidate should be able to exhibit strong ownership over assigned projects.
  • Should be a good people manager and good communication skills.
  • Should be PMP /Prince 2 certified.
  • Onsite experience is preferred.
  • Open to work in UK shift.


Interested candidate share their profile with the below details.

  • Total years of experience:
  • Relevant years of experience in Java:
  • Relevant years of experience in Project Management:
  • CTC:
  • ECTC:
  • Notice Period: Candidate should comfortable for join us within a week: Y/N:
  • PMP/Prince 2 certification completed Y/N:
  • Passport Have Y/N:
  • Onsite experience: Y/N:
  • Candidate should comfortable for UK shift: Y/N:

Regards,
Ipsita
Espire Infolabs

Salary: INR Best in Industry
Industry: IT-Software / Software Services
Functional Area: IT Software – Application Programming, Maintenance
Role Category: Programming & Design
Role: Product Manager
Employment Type: Permanent Job, Full Time
Keyskills: Project Management, PMP, Prince2, Project Scheduling, Java, Project Delivery, Agile, Scrum, Waterfall, Software Development Methodologies, Core Java.

3 Essentials of Applying LSS to AEC Firms

Applying Lean Six Sigma (LSS) to the architecture/engineering/construction (AEC) industry can create unique challenges. LSS is not heavily used in the service industry and almost never used in AEC businesses. When LSS is presented to an AEC firm one of the first comments from the company’s team members is, “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” This comment comes from a lack of understanding of what is possible. It comes from an attitude of “We’ve always done it this way.” What they do not realize is that their system is broken.

It has been estimated that the service industry is operating with a level of waste at close to 80 percent. Many AEC firms do not even attempt to reduce that waste and have no problem passing the cost of that waste on to their clients.

Introducing LSS to an engineering office, architectural office, or a team of construction workers can be daunting. In general, members of the AEC industry perceive LSS as not applicable and not useful to their day-to-day operations. This comes from an attitude of resisting change and results from rejecting LSS before they understand how it works. They do not believe the LSS success stories and think they are overstated. This resistance, however, is certainly not insurmountable. It does, however, require a deliberate approach.

1. Make LSS Strategic

It is critical that LSS be presented to the organization as the new method of operation, not just an experiment. It needs to be clear that LSS is not a fad that will fade but a permanent approach to doing business. This means that LSS needs to be built into the company strategy. It needs to be apparent in the long-term vision, mission, objectives and metrics, and needs to be cascaded to every operational unit throughout the organization.

Every member of the organization should not only have a clear understanding of what LSS is but should also understand how it applies to his or her daily activities. Members of an organization should understand how to use the LSS tools that apply to their daily efforts and see a direct connection from their application of those tools to the organizational system as a whole. This requires an extensive training program to ultimately touch every person in the organization.

2. Make LSS Cultural

Far too often the application of LSS becomes a recurring cycle of selecting a specific tool to use, celebrating temporary improvements, and then getting frustrated when the same old issues come right back. LSS is far more than a collection of tools. It is a powerful management and cultural paradigm that should affect every decision, behavior and action throughout the organization. Ultimately, those short-term temporary improvements need to evolve into long-term continuous improvement; this requires that LSS be deliberately infused into the culture of the organization.

Making LLS a vital part of the culture requires that the purpose and importance of LSS be included in the principles, values and beliefs fostered by the organization. It needs to become foundational to the purpose of the organization and essential to the organization’s competitive advantage and long-term success. Instead of just applying LSS tools, develop a LSS culture of continuous improvement.

3. Make LSS Scientific

If the organization is going to effectively apply LSS, members of the organization will need to witness its results. They will need to have clear evidence that the effort will be worth it. This means that the metrics used by the organization need to track the improvements directly associated with a LSS approach; the metrics should be strategically focused and not just randomly applied. If LSS efforts are not being measured, members of the organization will not take it seriously. Team members will assume the improvement does not matter. When the positive impact of LSS is made clear using effective metrics, the organization’s commitment to LSS is magnified.

It should be made clear that metrics are not to be used to punish or assign blame. They are used to drive performance and influence behavior. This means that metrics should not only include key performance indicators but also key behavioral indicators. This combination measures results as well as the behaviors contributing to those results. It is difficult to achieve high performance without encouraging ideal behaviors that create and sustain that level of performance.

Example: Engineering Calculations

A staff engineer spends 20 hours over three days preparing the calculations on a project. After completing the calculations, the staff engineer sends them to a senior engineer for review. The senior engineer does not get around to reviewing the calculations for two days. He then spends two hours reviewing the calculations and provides feedback.

The staff engineer then spends three additional hours revising the calculations and returns them back to the senior engineer. After two more days, the senior engineer spends another hour reviewing and provides additional feedback. The staff engineer then spends two more hours making revisions and sends the calculations back to the senior engineer. The senior engineer then sends the calculations to the engineer responsible for stamping. After four days and three hours of review time, the engineer in charge provides feedback to the staff engineer including several changes to the design approach of the project. The staff engineer spends six hours revising the calculations and sends them back to the engineer in charge and cc’s the senior engineer. After four more days, the staff engineer follows up with the engineer in charge to determine if the calculations are approved and stamped. Two days later, the engineer in charge sends the stamped calculations to the staff engineer.

Does this process seem rational? Or is it overburdened with repetitiveness and redundancies? In this example, the inefficiencies of the firm’s operations resulted in nearly 45 percent wasted time. This wasted time resulted in an extra cost of more than $1,500. This cost is covered by the firm, the client or both. It took the firm 17 days to produce a final product that could have been produced in four days if the waste and delays were eliminated. Unfortunately, this type of scenario is not uncommon.

Applying a LSS perspective to this example, the total amount of time spent on the project was 17 days times 8 hours per day, which equals 136 hours. The amount of time spent working on the project was 37 hours. The total waste time was 99 hours (73 percent). The goal should be 37 hours. (In the Lean world even that would be too much since there are probably inefficiencies in the way the work itself was performed.)

Example: Purchase Orders

Overly excessive control can seriously damage performance as happened in the purchasing office of one of the world’s largest oil and gas conglomerates. In this case, because of a history of inaccurate purchase orders, a series of controls were put in place to make sure that all purchase orders were properly vetted. A purchase order now required 16 approval signatures before it could be released.

The process of routing this document often took six to eight months. The business needed to streamline the process. Each of the 16 signees were asked what they looked for on the document to determine whether or not to sign it. Every one of the 16 shared that all they looked for was that another specific individual had signed the document. If so, they were sure the purchase order had to be correct.

In the end, they had 16 control points for every purchase order, all of which created waste and time delay, and none of which added value, since none of the signees actually checked the document. The failed system drove this behavior because it caused a false sense of security for all the signees. It would have been better to have one control point where the document was looked at carefully. Then there would be more accuracy and significantly less waste.

This type of redundancy and waste is also seen in the engineering example. Using the same logic, there was 90+ percent waste in the way project submittals were created. And this waste equates directly to dollars.

Conclusion

Few organizations in the AEC industry use LSS. They continue to do things the way they have always been done. They operate with huge amounts of waste and are making little effort to reduce that waste. This information should be exciting to the leaders of organizations in the AEC industry. Because if LSS can be used to reduce the waste in an organization, huge competitive advantages can be gained. A business will be able to provide unmatched service, production speed and quality at unbeatable prices.

When working to apply LSS, make it strategic, cultural and scientific. That is the formula for producing sustainable results that will render the competition irrelevant.

LEAN SIX SIGMA MAY PROVIDE ANSWERS TO CORRECTING OUTDATED EHR SYSTEMS

For healthcare professionals who work daily with electronic health records (EHR), the challenges in these systems is well known.

In the rush last decade to put electronic health records in place, many healthcare organizations now have poorly designed systems with documentation templates that can be difficult to manage. Creating efficient systems that provide a better charting of patients is a challenge.

However, a recent report from the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine said the answer could lie in the implementation of Lean Six Sigma methodology.

They even put the theory to the test.

Increased Productivity & Satisfaction

The Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine settled on the using the DMAIC approach to analyze the problem with EHRs and identify solutions. DMAIC is a Six Sigma methodology that stands for Design, Measure, Analyze, Improve and Control.

The challenge was quickly identified: limitations in the documentation system for both inpatient and outpatient therapists and occupational therapists. Specifically, a “poorly designed documentation template” that includes excessive redundancies of information. That resulted in a long, unclear patient document.

This made it difficult for therapists and other healthcare professionals to go into a patient’s records and find the information needed to help them provide the proper treatment. A major part of the problem was that neither the therapists or physicians were involved in the initial design of the documents or asked for any feedback on improving it.

The Mayo team focused on three areas for improvement: the amount of time spent by therapists with EHRs, increased staff productivity and improvement of stakeholders’ satisfaction.

The Results

Implementing Lean Six Sigma processes led to significant improvements in all three areas identified by the Mayo Clinic team.

They included:

  • Reduction in the time therapists spent interacting with EHRs from 2.8 hours per day to 1.9 hours per day
  • Increased time spent on patient care from 53% to 71%
  • Increased satisfaction levels for internal stakeholders (17% to 97.4%) and external stakeholders (43% to 80.3%)

While focused on a very specific issue, the Mayo Clinic project shows the potential for applying Lean Six Sigma to EHR issues.

And they are not alone. Dr. David Butler, writing for Healthcare IT News, has advocated for using the Lean tool of 5S to sort through problems with EHRs. He recommends creation of teams that include doctors, nurses and other healthcare professionals to put 5S into play and address specific problems.

The methodology stands for:

  • Remove any unnecessary clutter in a system or process
  • Set In Order. Find methods of storage that are effective and efficient
  • Properly clean the work area (in this case, the EHR) every day to maintain the improvements made in the Sort and Set in Order phases
  • Make these practices routine
  • Have the discipline to sustain all the positive improvements indefinitely

It’s a challenge, but 5S and other Lean, Six Sigma and Lean Six Sigma methods can lead to improvements in any kind of operation or system. For those working with outdated EHR systems, it could provide the answer they have been looking for that benefits both them and their patients.

ARMY, NAVY BASES GO ALL-IN ON LEAN, LEAN SIX SIGMA TRAINING

n 2017 and 2018, two military facilities in the southeastern United States have worked hard to emphasize Lean and Lean Six Sigma principles – and they’ve both gone about it in unique (but effective) ways.

Now, before we dive in, there’s an important distinction to make… Lean and Lean Six Sigma aren’t the same thing. This is a bit of an oversimplification, but it’s a simple way to differentiate the two schools of thought – Lean is about waste reduction, while Sigma is about defect prevention. Lean Six Sigma, then, is about reducing waste to prevent defects.

Anniston Army Depot

Anniston had a disappointing 2017 – at least, in one aspect. They failed to meet their process improvement goals for the year.

As a response to this, the leadership doubled-down on Lean training. It’s mandatory for all supervisors and employees, and the training covers much of the basics of Lean. And best of all, the training is simple. They use the acronym DOWNTIME to help employees remember what type of waste needs to be eliminated from their day-to-day work.

  • Defects
  • Overproduction
  • Waiting
  • Not utilizing employees/Injuries
  • Transportation
  • Inventory
  • Motion
  • Excess Processing

Anniston is striving to hit its process improvement goals over the next year, and as a result, it’s hoping to inspire and empower the depot’s workforce too. An article on army.mil quoted Aaron Parris – one of Anniston’s process improvement specialists.

He said, “The idea of Lean is to empower you… We want to give you a voice, the tools to make change and the forum to communicate the needs up the chain of command.”

Navy Medicine Operational Training Center

NMOTC is a training facility in Pensacola, Florida, dedicated to training and educating the Navy’s healthcare professionals. For the first time, in 2017, NMOTC committed itself to training its constituents on Lean Six Sigma principles.

They have a tiered approach to training. It starts with the White Belt introductory course (which provides some general knowledge on all the ways Lean Six Sigma can be used to improve Navy Medicine). The next phase is the Yellow Belt course, which expands on the initial lessons in the introductory training.

After completing the Yellow Belt course, the next step is a week-long Green Belt course, which focuses on systematic problem-solving and process improvement strategies. But before moving onto the final tier, NMOTC constituents are asked to spend one year putting their Green Belt training to use. They’re required to improve one of the NMOTC’s processes.

In an article on dvidshub.net, Yeoman 2nd Class Dylan Greene explained his yearlong Green Belt project. “One of my projects I am working on getting approved is NMOTC’s check-in/check-out process. I think it has a lot of potential to be streamlined and overall make the process and paperwork run more smoothly.”

After completing the yearlong project, constituents can move into the Black Belt training course, which provides insight on real, meaningful organizational change.

By offering such robust and well-delivered Lean Six Sigma training, NMOTC is hoping to improve the skillset of its students – and provide them a framework in which they can solve problems and more effectively do their jobs.

LEAN SIX SIGMA GOES BACK TO SCHOOL

Every industry is built on a foundation of processes and systems. Technology, manufacturing, consulting, thought leadership and more.

If there are underlying processes, then fundamentally, those processes can be improved. That’s why it’s so silly when some people say that Six Sigma and Lean are manufacturing-focused methodologies.

They’re not. They’re process improvement methodologies. And, at the risk of sounding redundant, every industry is built on processes.

Take education as an example. It’s the effective design and delivery of instruction. Methods and styles change from teacher to teacher and student to student, but it’s still a process-based medium. Think about all the administrative work that goes into a school or university. Or the enrollment process.

All this can be improved and strengthened, just like the Toyota production factories and Motorola assembly lines from the early days of Six Sigma.

It might seem far-fetched to you, but it’s absolutely possible, and one school is doing its best to demonstrate it.

A Lesson in Lean Six Sigma

In Racine County, Wisconsin, the Racine Unified School District has applied Lean Six Sigma techniques to redefine its enrollment process in its middle school. Aas part of their Lean Six Sigma initiative, the school’s board members were asked to complete low-level process improvement training, which has already led to some fascinating ideas.

“From our perspective, you can remove Lean Six Sigma from the title and say we bring people together to look at a process from a holistic standpoint,” said Kamaljit Jackson, Unified’s senior accountability and efficiency officer in an article for The Journal Times, a local newspaper.

The district wants to get every staff member involved in process improvement brainstorming (which is a tried-and-true Lean Six Sigma tenet) – everyone from teachers, to receptionists, to janitors. And collectively, the school district wants to figure out how to gather and use data more effectively.

“We have a lot of data points here, and we need to use those data points to make decisions on what strategies we need to use to make sure our students are successful on the academic side,” Jackson said.

Lean Six Sigma and Education

The Racine Unified School District is just one example, and if they’re successful in their process improvement initiative, dissenters might call them an outlier. But the principles of Lean Six Sigma are sound and valid – and there’s no reason they wouldn’t work at other levels of education too.

In fact, they have.

Singapore Management University (SMU) created significant change in their institution by training staff on Lean Six Sigma methodologies. Staff that have already earned their Green Belts are given additional training and guidance to further develop their process improvement knowledge and skills. And, to advance in the training program, staff actually have to put the lessons into action. Everyone is expected to implement and contribute to a Lean Six Sigma project designed to improve the university.

Meanwhile, the University of Miami-Ohio has been called one of the most efficient schools in the country because of their work with Lean and Six Sigma principles – from big, campus-wide initiatives, to small and granular improvements (like digitizing the fingerprinting processes the campus police use).

All industries are founded on processes, and all processes can improve – even if that improvement is only slight. But even so, any improvement – especially in education – is a step in the right direction.

Lean six sigma JOB- Senior Manager Process Improvement

Designation Senior Manager Process Improvement (customer Experience)
Job Description Job Summary
A Senior Manager Process Improvement – Customer Experience will be responsible to Undertake/ Train/ Coach/ Mentor resources (Via standup training classes) on Six Sigma, Lean and related process improvement methodologies & Projects.
Job Responsibilities
To train company resources via stand up training classes on Six Sigma, Lean and related process improvement methodologies.
To write and update training material and content around Six Sigma, Lean / process improvement.
To co-ordinate training programs around the above for HC India.
To coach & mentor, resources undertaking Six Sigma/Lean process improvement projects.
Desired Profile
Any Graduate
Excellent Analytical skills are preffered
Knowledge of Process improvement methodologies such as Lean six Sigma, Kaizen, 7QC tools are preferred.
Excel skills and Power Point skills are must for this position.
Project Management knowledge will be good have
Who Should Join
Ability to be a stand up trainer for Analysts , Managers, AVPs , VPs on the topic of Six Sigma and Quality Improvement Methodology.
Extremely high mentoring skills around process improvement.
Extremely articulate, ability to explain and teach complex statistical methodologies.
Desired Profile Please refer to the Job description above
Experience 6 – 11 Years
Industry Type Banking / Financial Services / Broking
Role Other
Functional Area Other
Employment Type Full Time , Permanent Job
Education UG –

PG –

Doctorate –

Compensation:  Not disclosed
Location Delhi NCRGurgaon
Keywords lean six sigma coaching process improvement six sigma quality kaizen mentoring senior management customer experience quality improvement

What Makes the Perfect Six Sigma Project Champion?

Have you ever had a manager at work who made things just run smoothly, with everyone doing their job, following protocol and keeping up a great attitude? If you were lucky enough to experience this euphoria, then you were in the presence of what it takes to be a Six Sigma Champion. 

The determination and diplomacy it takes to be a Six Sigma Champion is deserving of its Champion status. Of all the roles involved in a project, the one of Champion is the most difficult to fill, because the key ingredient can’t be feigned. Luckily, the project champion isn’t a formal official role that must be filled, much like a project manager would be. 

Having a project champion can make everything easier to maneuver around in the workplace, especially with obstacles and challenges that might occur during the project.

Traits of a Project Champion

Just what makes up a stellar project champion?

  • The ability to understand data and other pertinent elements of the project.
  • The ability to meet and exceed expectations set forth.
  • The innate ability to motivate and inspire entire teams while meeting project goals in a timely fashion. 
  • The diplomacy to negotiate with all to ensure success.
  • Be a great communicator to all parties.
  • Have exceptional organization skills.
  • Be exceptional at problem solving.

The only trait that is hard to learn (but not impossible) is that of motivator. Not everyone can motivate and inspire others. Those who can and are in business go far in management because they are able to lead teams into greatness. 

Six Sigma, in a sense, is a template for motivating and inspiring teams into greatness. It may not always be possible to have a project champion, simply because most of the time the perfect candidate isn’t around.

Six sigma / PMP JOB- Senior Project Executive

Job Description

Primary Role Description: 

1. Job holder will be responsible for Creating the Scope, Project Charter & Milestones for the Project & manage Progressive elaborates throughout the Project Lifecycle.
2. Call Cross Functional Meetings, Documenting Minutes, Tracking Actionable and Report progress in various forums, define and/ or creating hard and soft Measures of Success (MOS)
3. Manage Project Risks , Issues & escalations for quick resolution
4. Performance of the Job holder will be Measured basis Project Deliverables within Quality ,Time, budget compliance , and degree of the stated Objectives are met
5. The profile requires the Project manager to Build strong working relationship with multiple stakeholders in various departments or function within company, Develop a keen understanding of the business along with upstream, downstream effects of process

Key Roles & Responsibilities: 

  • Project Management
  • Analytical and communication skills
  • Manage stakeholder relationships
  • Evaluate and improve project performance

Key Requirements Education & Certificates: 

  • Graduate / Post Graduate in any discipline (IT/Computer Science preferred)
  • PMP Trained and/or Six sigma certified (Preferable)
Key Requirements – Experience & Skills: 

  • Experience in managing Quality Projects & initiatives in an organization
  • Prior Experience in Leading Projects ( Technology enabled Projects /Business Continuity Plan (BCP) experience will be preferred )
  • Good verbal and written Skills
  • Proficient user of Microsoft Office packages (Excel, Word, PowerPoint, Outlook)
  • Should have experience of 1 to 5 years in project management

Salary: INR 3,00,000 – 4,50,000 P.A.
Industry: Insurance
Functional Area: Other
Employment Type: Permanent Job, Full Time
Keyskills: Project Management, PMP Trained, SCOPE, Six Sigma Certified, Quality Management, Business Continuity, Planning, Writing Skills, Computer Science, Communication Skills, MS Office.

Tiny variations: the big picture

Here in the middle of Mental Health Awareness Week, I’m reminded that the human brain operates on a continuum of reliabilty, having hit one of those mornings where everything I touch seems to go unspectacularly awry: a to-and-fro with a designer on an upcoming whitepaper (the fault is entirely mine for re-jigging the order of questions in a survey without telling him which bit of text goes with which graph) and a small coffee spillage makes me realise that ‘functional’ is a long way from ‘optimal’.

 

As with all good processes, then, it’s important to match the task to the materials, and it seems smart to acknowledge my temporary wollliness and focus instead on tasks that have a distant deadline – certainly long enough to be given a considered redraft with fresh eyes when the fog clears.  

The beauty of robots is that they don’t have moods like this: 24/7/365, they just need a steady electrical supply and the work keeps on flowing. This human is quickly realising there are only so many hot drinks one can usefully have in a morning.

A fleeting variation in my mental capacity may not have a huge impact on the rest of the business, but process variations across larger areas can be a headache for larger organizations. ‘Managing process variations still seems to be unnecessarily complex, costly, and inconsistent,’ says Ivan Seselj quoting Steve Stanton, an analyst with FCB Partners: ’90 percent of the organizations I know have failed at standardization.’

And yet standardization seems to be the end goal for many of the processes under consideration. This wrestling with standardization vs specialization may not be doing us any favours: the small project doesn’t have the oversight to make the best decisions, and the centralized decision makers will struggle to take into account all of the granular knowledge to ensure that their scheme will work in a particular environment.

A great example of getting the best of both worlds is the company Biwater, a company specializing in water infrastructure.

 

Their approach, and one we should all think about following, is to be selective about the knowledge applied in a specific area. The truth is that excellence doesn’t look the same from every angle, and the same solution will not fit every problem equally well. Biwater builds in variation at the beginning of their project, rather than leaving it to the last minute and having to fit a solution into a space it wasn’t built for.

It put me in mind of Alex Balbontin, who talked to Seth Adler on the Pex Podcast about the difficulty of getting RPA to work in a fragmented space: ‘It’s early days [of RPA] for banks… the more you see of a process, the more you have to look at it at a key stroke level… and you can see so many variants depending on the type of client, the market the legal entity… so you might find a team of 20 people doing some work with, you map what they do at key stroke level you find naturally you have 200 variants, so how do you robotize a process like that?’ (Skip to minute 27 for this discussion.)

LEAN SIX SIGMA MAY PROVIDE ANSWERS TO CORRECTING OUTDATED EHR SYSTEMS

For healthcare professionals who work daily with electronic health records (EHR), the challenges in these systems is well known.

In the rush last decade to put electronic health records in place, many healthcare organizations now have poorly designed systems with documentation templates that can be difficult to manage. Creating efficient systems that provide a better charting of patients is a challenge.

However, a recent report from the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine said the answer could lie in the implementation of Lean Six Sigma methodology.

They even put the theory to the test.

Increased Productivity & Satisfaction

The Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine settled on the using the DMAIC approach to analyze the problem with EHRs and identify solutions. DMAIC is a Six Sigma methodology that stands for Design, Measure, Analyze, Improve and Control.

The challenge was quickly identified: limitations in the documentation system for both inpatient and outpatient therapists and occupational therapists. Specifically, a “poorly designed documentation template” that includes excessive redundancies of information. That resulted in a long, unclear patient document.

This made it difficult for therapists and other healthcare professionals to go into a patient’s records and find the information needed to help them provide the proper treatment. A major part of the problem was that neither the therapists or physicians were involved in the initial design of the documents or asked for any feedback on improving it.

The Mayo team focused on three areas for improvement: the amount of time spent by therapists with EHRs, increased staff productivity and improvement of stakeholders’ satisfaction.

The Results

Implementing Lean Six Sigma processes led to significant improvements in all three areas identified by the Mayo Clinic team.

They included:

  • Reduction in the time therapists spent interacting with EHRs from 2.8 hours per day to 1.9 hours per day
  • Increased time spent on patient care from 53% to 71%
  • Increased satisfaction levels for internal stakeholders (17% to 97.4%) and external stakeholders (43% to 80.3%)

While focused on a very specific issue, the Mayo Clinic project shows the potential for applying Lean Six Sigma to EHR issues.

And they are not alone. Dr. David Butler, writing for Healthcare IT News, has advocated for using the Lean tool of 5S to sort through problems with EHRs. He recommends creation of teams that include doctors, nurses and other healthcare professionals to put 5S into play and address specific problems.

The methodology stands for:

  • Remove any unnecessary clutter in a system or process
  • Set In Order. Find methods of storage that are effective and efficient
  • Properly clean the work area (in this case, the EHR) every day to maintain the improvements made in the Sort and Set in Order phases
  • Make these practices routine
  • Have the discipline to sustain all the positive improvements indefinitely

It’s a challenge, but 5S and other Lean, Six Sigma and Lean Six Sigma methods can lead to improvements in any kind of operation or system. For those working with outdated EHR systems, it could provide the answer they have been looking for that benefits both them and their patients.